Event Access Guide

Torso level photo of three Black and disabled folx (a non-binary person holding a cane, a non-binary person in a power wheelchair, and a femme on a folding chair) raising their fists on the sidewalk in front of a white wall.
This photo was taken by Chona Kasinger for Disabled And Here
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The accommodations for natural human variation should be mutual.

@LAURENANCONA

House shows always present accessibility challenges because so little housing stock is truly accessible. Yet, house shows are where DIY scenes happen. They are where we build public space from private space.

For our shows, we strive to ensure wheelchair users (and everyone else) can:

piss, shit, eat, drink, sit down, and access quiet space and outdoor space.

We need to be able to piss, shit, eat, drink, sit down, and access quiet space and outdoor space.

The reality is that marginalized people experience discrimination in public spaces. As they move through their lives and through various spaces, they cannot predict if they will be treated with respect, let alone if they will be safe. When they attend a show or event at your space, they should be able to know what to expect, or at least what you intend to have happen—and not happen—within your walls. So, how can you let them know? You can’t just open the door; you have to put out a welcome mat.

Making Spaces Safer: A Guide to Giving Harassment the Boot Wherever You Work, Play, and Gather

Of course, making safer spaces is more than a checklist. You have to think both holistically and specifically. For instance, don’t overlook the little things that make up the overall feel of your space.

Making Spaces Safer: A Guide to Giving Harassment the Boot Wherever You Work, Play, and Gather

Five Ways to Welcome all Bodyminds to Your Event

We have detailed accessibility checklists and recommendations in our course “Enable Dignity: The Accommodations for Natural Human Variation Should Be Mutual“, but for this piece we reduce down to five things you can learn and do to welcome all bodyminds to your learning event.

  • Create real access pages.
  • Create Cavendish Space with caves, campfires, and watering holes.
  • Provide interaction badges.
  • Offer bodymind affirmations and provide outlets for stimming, pacing, fidgeting, and retreating.
  • Ensure there is quiet space and outdoor space that people can access at any time.
Five Ways to Welcome All Bodyminds to Your Learning Event

General Do’s & Don’ts for Interacting with Disabled People

  1. Do yield to people with mobility aids (e.g. wheelchairs, crutches, walkers, canes). 
  2. Do not touch, lean on or push anyone’s mobility equipment.
  3. Do not bend down to talk to someone in a wheelchair. If you find it difficult to maintain the conversation, pull up a chair.
  4. Do ask before you try to assist someone. What you assume is helpful may not be.
  5. Do speak directly to a disabled person (not the ASL interpreter, personal care assistant, etc.). 
  6. Do not pet, feed, or otherwise distract a service dog. Please approach their handler before interacting.

Source: Accessibility Services — Midwest FurFest

Access Survey

Survey venues with this access survey.

Accessibility is a collective process!

Riah Person

Enable Dignity

We have detailed accessibility checklists and guidelines and philosophy here.

Here’s a detailed air quality checklist.